Comet Photos - Hale Bopp (1997) Hyakutake (1996)

Updated December 25, 2001

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Comet Hale-Bopp - March 26, 1997. A 1 second photo by Mario Tonklii on Kodak 1000 film. Taken with a 13.1 inch reflector F4.5 using eyepiece project with a 27mm eyepiece. Mario took this photo from his home near Dayton, Ohio.

Hale-Bopp - March 31, 1997. Another 1 second photo by Mario. The contrast and brightness were slightly adjusted to bring out more
detail in the nucleus. Notice the change in the ring structure and the fainter ring in the March 31 photo.

Hale-Bopp. A March 11, 1997 morning photo using a normal 50mm lens by Mario.


Hale-Bopp - March 31. An evening photograph taken by Mario.

Hale-Bopp. February 20, 1997 4:42 A.M. Eastern Standard Time. Taken by Mark Pogany with a Nikkormat FT2 105 mm lens at f/2.3. 3 minute exposure on hypered Tech Pan film. Mark took this picture from his backyard in Willoughby Hills, Ohio.

Hale-Bopp - A color photo of Mark and the comet. Taken with a 50 mm lens at Salt Fork State Park located in southeast Ohio.


Hale-Bopp. Morning of March 9, 1997. Taken by Mark Pogany with a
Mamiya RB67 127 mm lens at f/3.8. 6 minute exposure on hypered Tech
Pan film. Mark took this picture from Salt Fork State Park. Mark and Andy drove there from Cleveland to escape persistent cloudy Northeast Ohio skies. The picture was slightly sharpened and brightened in order to bring out more detail in the tail. The original photo does not show as many stars.

Hale-Bopp - Same place, camera and exposure time as the prior picture.

Hale-Bopp. Morning of March 9. Taken by Steve Fishman with an Olympus OM-1 135 mm lens at f/2.8 and Fujicolor 800 film. 5 minute exposure Taken at Russell Park in Geauga County. The photo has been slightly sharpened and brightened to bring out details in the blue ion tail.



Hale-Bopp. Morning of March 10. Taken by Steve Fishman with an Olympus OM-1 135 mm lens at f/2.8 and Fujicolor 800 film. 3 minute exposure. Taken at his home in the light polluted skies in Orange Village.

Hale-Bopp. During the week of March 24. Dan Rothstein and Steve drove to the Big South Fork National River and Recreation area in Tennessee. This picture and the following 2 were taken by Steve on March 26 during the early evening hours.

135 mm f2.8 at 2 minutes. Fujicolor 800 film. Compare to the March 9 photo at the upper right.

Hale-Bopp. 52 mm f2.8 at 3 minutes. Fujicolor 800 film.


Hale-Bopp. 28 mm f2.8 at 2 minutes. Fujicolor 800 film.

Hale-Bopp. Taken the next evening, March 27 with a 135 mm f2.8 at 3 minutes. Fujicolor 800 film.

Hale-Bopp. Taken by Steve on April 11 at South Chagrin Metropark with a 50 mm f1.8 lens. The moon appears at the upper left. Fujicolor 800 film.


Hale-Bopp. Mark Pogany, Andy Winzer and Denny Jefferson flew to New Mexico to observe and photograph Hale-Bopp. This is a 5 minute photo taken by Mark on March 29 with a Mamiya 645
camera, 80mm at f2.5. Kodak Pro 400 MC 120 format film. They
traveled to the high desert 30 miles north of Las Cruces, New Mexico.

Hale-Bopp. A 30 second photo taken by Mark during a comet party at the
Tombaugh Observatory of New Mexico State University campus on March 27. Also used the Mamiya 645 camera 80mm at f1/9.



Hale-Bopp
. Former CVAS member Matt Heino moved to Las Cruces a few years ago. He hosted our CVAS members for several evenings. Mark took this photo from Matt's house, just 5 miles from downtown Las Cruces. These skies were just as dark as our Indian Hill site, which is over 30 miles from downtown Cleveland. This is a 40 second photo with the Mamiya 645 camera 80mm f1.9.




Hale-Bopp. Gary Woznicki, a former CVAS member took this photo on the morning of March 12. He used Fuji HG1600 film on an Astrophysics 105mm F6 Traveler refractor. Time of exposure was 3 minutes and was taken in Gates Mills,Ohio.



Hyakutake. Talk about desperation, Mark Pogany and 3 other CVAS members drove over 50 miles westward from the east side of Cleveland to escape the clouds on March 23, 1996. We were rewarded with clear skies near Sandusky. Mark took this picture of Hyakutake rising in the east over a "cold" farmfield near Monroeville, Ohio. It was 20 degree f with a constant 15-20 mph wind. Photo data: Hypered Tech Pan 2415 film. 35mm f/1.4 Nikor at f/2. Taken with home made barn door camera drive. 2 minute exposure



Hyakutake The next morning, Sunday March 24, 1996, Mark and others drove to LaDue Reservoir, Auburn Corners, Ohio. Picture taken with a Bronica ETRS and 75mm f/2.8 lens. Hypered Tech Pan 2415 film. 6 minute exposure taken with home made barn door camera drive. 2 minute exposure




Comet Hyakutake. 3/30/96. Taken by Mark at Indian Hill Observatory,
Huntsburg, Ohio. 35mm f/1.4 Nikor at f/2.8. 1 minute exposure
on Ektar 1000 film.



Comet Hyakutake. 3/30/96. Another picture by Mark from Indian Hill Observatory, Huntsburg, Ohio. 35mm f/1.4 Nikor at f/2.8. 1 minute exposure on Ektar 1000 film.



Comet Hyakutake. From Mark's north facing kitchen window. March 27, 1996, 2:30 AM 35mm f/1.4 Nikor at f/2.0 for 5 minutes. The comet was near the pole star, so a longer fixed camera exposure was possible without star trails.




Comet Hyakutake. Also sensing poor Northeast Ohio skies, Don Himes and his wife Kim drove to White River State Park in Indiana to photograph and observe the Comet. This picture was taken on March 23, 1996 2:00 AM, 80mm f/2.8, 200 ASA, 15 Minutes Exposure. The bright
orange star is Arcturus.



Comet Hyakutake. After returning from Indiana, during the night of March 26-27,Don took this 5 minute photograph using a 28mm lens at f/2.8. He used hypered tech film with his camera piggy backed on the CVAS 16" telescope.



Comet Hyakutake. 3/16/96. 3:00 AM. 200mm f/2.8 15 minute 1000 ASA color print film by Don.

 
Special Photos:
October 30, 2003 Aurora